Laughter

the human race has one really effective weapon


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Pain Jerk + Russell Haswell on Editions Mego

Russell Haswell and Pain Jerk  are teaming up for a 2CD release due out in June on Editions Mego. You can read the press release below while you check out the preview Editions Mego posted to Soundcloud above. I’ve included a pair of Youtube videos of Pain Jerk and Russell Haswell performing live too, just in case you need to familiarize yourself a little more (in case you don’t know, much of it is very loud, so start the volume somewhere down low). Very much looking forward to this one.

From Editions Mego:

Electroacoustic Sludge Dither Transformation Smear Grind Decomposition nO!se File Exchange Mega Edit is the long awaited collaboration from two of the world finest purveyors of noise, electroacoustics and top shelf audio mayhem. Having met at the legendary Tokyo venue 20000 volts in 1997 Haswell and Pain Jerk (Kohei Gomi) stayed in touch with the intent to collaborate at some point in the future. This was eventually realized in 2012 when they were offered a gig to play together at the Rammel Club in Nottingham. Prior to the show they exchanged files of solo recordings, as a means of forming a basis for what was initially conceived as an ‘extreme duet tag mass attack’. It was here that the foundation was laid for the epic extreme end result we now encounter. The Nottingham performance was recorded and both parties took away the results in addition to their solo recordings to re-edit and re-send, back and forth, for 2 years, re-editing, re-contextualising these original sounds.

The results of this extended collaboration is a punk academic collision which utilises advanced computer music techniques and analogue/digital modular synthesizer splurge, along with the more basic and belligerent frequencies found in distortion and feedback. This can also be read as a study of editing in all forms; hyper editing, editing in pop music, editing in dance culture, electro-acoustic editing, the editing techniques used in musique concrète, editing used in film and advertising along with the notion of gaps – the audible and inaudible.

A blistering 2CD collision of transformation, technique, ideas and form which resides equally in the advanced fields of electroacoustic study and the high energy freeform noise from which both practitioners sprung.

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Review: Helm, “Silencer”

luke_younger_photoMy first review for Dusted Magazine is up over at the new Dusted Tumblr site. I’m very excited to be writing for them and I hope you will check the site out, read some of the other reviews, then maybe grab a copy of Helm’s Silencer. I spent a lot of time with it and it was one of my favorite records of 2013. It definitely deserves your attention:

Luke Younger takes a risk on the Silencer EP, his first ever 12-inch and the follow-up to his well-loved Impossible Symmetry full-length on Bill Kouligas’s PAN imprint. Like other noise-minded artists before him, Younger has decided to add the power of a prominent beat to his already deep mix of altered gadget noise, tape collage and electro-acoustic miscellany.

Read the rest here.

I have much more lined up for Dusted, as well as reviews of Air Supply and Photographs in the pipeline for Brainwashed.com—hoping to get 2014 off to a strong start with lots of writing.


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Review: Kevin Drumm, “Earrach”

Kevin Drumm’s incredible run of handmade CD-Rs continues this year despite the termination of his Recreational Panick blog. At the end of August, Drumm simultaneously announced the availability of his last few homemade discs and the existence of a new Bandcamp page, which he promptly filled with several digital reissues of limited cassette and CD-R editions from 2011 and 2012. Three new albums followed shortly thereafter, of which the tape-based two-disc Earrach—that’s Gaelic for “spring”—is one. Appropriately, Drumm has filled it with fleshy, muddy, physical music. It’s sloppy, weird, and suggestive; and an absolutely killer recording that squirms and jumps with warped alien life.

The list of equipment used to record Earrach is short and simple: tapes, a Tascasm 414, a Kenwood 1080 receiver, and two handheld cassette recorders. Drumm includes just two other lines of information on the back of the album’s green paper sleeve. The second reads “cassette tape music.” The first, “caisead fusillade,” which marries the Gaelic word for “cassette” to a term associated with firearms and bombardments.

Read the rest of the review on Brainwashed.com
Earrach is available through Kevin Drumm’s Bandcamp page, and physically through Erstwhile Distribution.